Updating zone file in bind online matchmaking for dating

Posted by / 17-Jul-2017 18:54

actually get updated with the contents of the most recent DDNS updates.Similar to a journalling filesystem, the $file saves updates to prevent data loss in the event of a crash. options ; // If you enable a local name server, do not forget to enter 127.0.0.1 // first in your /etc/so this server will be queried. Name servers that are serving a lot of clients will benefit more from this approach than individual hosts. To use this mechanism, uncomment the entries below, and comment the hint zone above. NET are available for AXFR from these servers on IPv4 and IPv6: dns.icann.org, dns.*/ /* zone "." ; zone "arpa" ; */ /* Serving the following zones locally will prevent any queries for these zones leaving your network and going to the root name servers. INT is Deprecated (RFC 4159) zone "ip6.int" ; // NB: Do not use the IP addresses below, they are faked, and only // serve demonstration/documentation purposes! It can be convenient to become // a slave at least for the zone your own domain is in. // // Before starting to set up a master zone, make sure you fully // understand how DNS and BIND work. If and when the master server dies or is unreachable, the slave name server will have the transferred zone information and will be able to serve it.$TTL 3600 ; 1 hour default TTL Failure to do this might render the service attacks. Even with // simple mistakes, you can break connectivity for affected parties, // or cause huge amounts of useless Internet traffic. Greater resilience to any potential root server failure/DDo S On the other hand, this method requires more monitoring than the hints file to be sure that an unexpected failure mode has not incapacitated your server. No spurious traffic will be sent from your network to the roots */ // RFCs 19 (and BCP 32 for localhost) zone "localhost" ; zone "127.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "255.in-addr.arpa" ; // RFC 1912-style zone for IPv6 localhost address zone "0.ip6.arpa" ; // "This" Network (RFCs 19) zone "0.in-addr.arpa" ; // Private Use Networks (RFCs 19) zone "10.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "16.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "17.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "18.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "19.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "20.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "21.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "22.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "23.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "24.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "25.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "26.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "27.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "28.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "29.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "30.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "31.172.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "168.192.in-addr.arpa" ; // Link-local/APIPA (RFCs 39) zone "254.169.in-addr.arpa" ; // IETF protocol assignments (RFCs 57) zone "0.0.192.in-addr.arpa" ; // TEST-NET-[1-3] for Documentation (RFCs 57) zone "2.0.192.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "1.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "113.0.203.in-addr.arpa" ; // IPv6 Range for Documentation (RFC 3849) zone "8.b.d.0.1.0.0.2.ip6.arpa" ; // Domain Names for Documentation and Testing (BCP 32) zone "test" ; zone "example" ; zone "invalid" ; zone "example.com" ; zone "example.net" ; zone "example.org" ; // Router Benchmark Testing (RFCs 25) zone "18.198.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "19.198.in-addr.arpa" ; // IANA Reserved - Old Class E Space (RFC 5735) zone "240.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "241.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "242.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "243.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "244.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "245.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "246.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "247.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "248.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "249.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "250.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "251.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "252.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "253.in-addr.arpa" ; zone "254.in-addr.arpa" ; // IPv6 Unassigned Addresses (RFC 4291) zone "1.ip6.arpa" ; zone "3.ip6.arpa" ; zone "4.ip6.arpa" ; zone "5.ip6.arpa" ; zone "6.ip6.arpa" ; zone "7.ip6.arpa" ; zone "8.ip6.arpa" ; zone "9.ip6.arpa" ; zone "a.ip6.arpa" ; zone "b.ip6.arpa" ; zone "c.ip6.arpa" ; zone "d.ip6.arpa" ; zone "e.ip6.arpa" ; zone "0.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "1.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "2.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "3.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "4.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "5.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "6.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "7.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "8.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "9.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "a.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "b.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "0.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "1.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "2.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "3.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "4.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "5.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "6.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "7.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; // IPv6 ULA (RFC 4193) zone "c.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "d.f.ip6.arpa" ; // IPv6 Link Local (RFC 4291) zone "8.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "9.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "a.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "b.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; // IPv6 Deprecated Site-Local Addresses (RFC 3879) zone "c.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "d.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "e.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; zone "f.e.f.ip6.arpa" ; // IP6. // // NB: Do not blindly enable the examples below. /* An example dynamic zone key "exampleorgkey" ; zone "example.org" ; */ /* Example of a slave reverse zone zone "1.168.192.in-addr.arpa" ; */In the slave case, the zone information is transferred from the master name server for the particular zone, and saved in the file specified. ( 2006051501 ; Serial 10800 ; Refresh 3600 ; Retry 604800 ; Expire 300 ; Negative Response TTL ) ; DNS Servers IN NS ns1. After these steps are done the old key can be removed from the zone.

Now here’s how you tell sed what you want done (note, this formula assumes that your previous serial numbers were post-2000): This says to replace any text starting with 20 [any two numbers 0-9] and followed by another 7 digits with the string: 2013082100 Problem solved, check out your zones now (provided they end in the standard format of db).

A second security policy allows the administrator to grant fine-grained dynamic DNS update access to specific hosts or specific users, the .

zone is the name or subdomain this key is allowed to update, and record-types is a list of DNS record types this key is allowed to update.

While the base system package can be configured to provide resolution services beyond the local machine, it is recommended that such requirements be addressed by installing ;; Number of trusted keys: 1 ;; Chasing:

// This is named after the first bytes of the IP address, in reverse // order, with ".

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The most simple form of access control grants a key permission to add, updated, or delete any DNS record in a specified DNS zone.